today’s answer to how to deal with grief

How To Deal With Grief ? (Click this and visit the original site of audio teaching series by Andrew Wommack)

Quote: “Grief is something that each one of us encounters sooner or later. It cannot be avoided, but it can be dealt with in a positive way. Some of the most influential people in history became better and more compassionate because of the way they dealt with grief; others were thrown into a destructive spiral. This series will help you to come out of grief on the victory side.”

The series covers the following topic:

Your Situation Isn’t Unique

It Came To Pass

God Is Not The Cause Of Our Grief

The Source Of All Grief

Here is an excerpt of the article by the same author, Andrew Wommack.

quote: “The dictionary defines “grief” as, “deep sadness, as over a loss; sorrow” (NAHD). This is not limited to, but certainly includes, the loss of a loved one. It includes the sense of loss that many feel for those who died in the terrorist attacks. People grieve over the loss of relationships, careers, youth, innocence, and many other things.

Those who have lived any length of time are well acquainted with grief and know that it is an inescapable part of life. We cannot avoid all grief, but we can avoid all the destruction that grief can cause.

One of the first things I always minister to those experiencing grief is that their situation isn’t unique. I think this is very important. One of the devil’s most deceptive ploys is to make you think that no one else knows what you are going through. There have even been songs written about, “Nobody knows the trouble I feel, nobody knows my sorrow.” That just isn’t true.

The Scripture says very plainly, “There hath no temptation taken you but such as is common to man” (1 Cor. 10:13). Any situation you find yourself in is not only experienced by others, but it is a common experience to us all. This is very important to understand. If Satan can make you believe your situation is unique, then you automatically exempt yourself from all help that is available. Regardless of how others attempt to help, you remain beyond their reach because, in your mind, they haven’t experienced your loss and therefore can’t understand or help you. That isn’t true….

In the early days of our ministry, people stayed away from our meetings by the droves. I was having a hard time coping with that. It was causing me grief. Then I went to some of Kenneth Copeland’s first public meetings.

He rented the Will Roger’s Memorial Auditorium in Fort Worth for a three-day meeting. That auditorium seated 3,500, but he only had one or two hundred there at the most. When I saw that Kenneth was experiencing the same numbers problem I was, it really encouraged me. It didn’t bless me that people weren’t coming to his meetings, but I took courage that someone whom I knew was anointed was experiencing the same problems that I was. 
 Those experiencing grief need to see that others have experienced similar things and have lived through it. In fact, people go on to thrive, not just survive. ..
Another very comforting thing to remember in a time of grief is that the situation is only temporary. One of my favorite phrases in the Bible is, “It came to pass.” That’s why it came: to pass. No tragedy is permanent. Even death is only a temporary separation.

This is exactly the logic the Apostle Paul used to comfort those who had lost someone they loved. ..
Death is not a permanent split for believers. It is just a long separation. We will be united with those who have died. Remembering this will bring comfort (1 Thess. 4:18) and can even provide a lot of positive motivation.

Putting all our tragedies into the perspective of eternity also minimizes their impact on us. .. Romans 8:18 says, “For I reckon that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory which shall be revealed in us.”

Paul suffered more persecution than any of us ever have…
His affliction wasn’t light because it was less than ours, but because he put it into a different perspective. He said his afflictions were light because they were “but for a moment” (2 Cor. 4:17). After a million years in the presence of the Lord, all the hardships of his life would seem like nothing. That’s true for all of us.

I once had a woman tell me about her terrible situation and ask for prayer for her marriage… I said, “Now, let me get this straight. You aren’t a Christian, and you know you are headed for hell; yet you want me to pray for your marriage and not your salvation?” She said, “Yes.” I said, “After you’ve been burning in hell for a thousand years, you won’t even care whether you were ever married or not. Your marriage isn’t the important thing. We need to pray for your salvation!” She agreed and I had the privilege of leading her to the Lord! We then prayed for her marriage…

 Probably the most important thing I minister to those experiencing grief is that God is not the source of their grief. I believe this is absolutely essential. Anyone who believes that God directly causes their grief, or indirectly allows it to happen, is headed for trouble.

Many people are totally shocked at that last statement…

Look at 2 Peter 3:9. It says, “The Lord is not slack concerning his promise, as some men count slackness; but is longsuffering to us-ward, not willing that any should perish, but that all should come to repentance.” You can’t get it any clearer than that. It is not God’s will for any to perish, but they do…

 The Lord does everything possible to stop people from going to hell. He sent His only begotten Son to earth to bear our sins. He sent His Holy Spirit to convict us and draw us to Him. He sends laborers across our paths. Any person who goes to hell will have to climb over all these roadblocks that the Lord has put in their way. It’s not God allowing them to go to hell. It’s people’s own free will that God gave them which causes their destruction, not God… 

The Lord is not insensitively standing by and allowing us to suffer. He is touched with our feelings (Heb. 4:15) and has sent His Holy Spirit to comfort us in whatever trial may come (2 Cor. 1:3-4).

This article covers only a very small portion of the material included on my four-part album entitled, How To: Deal With Grief. This is not just for those who have lost loved ones. It will reveal principles that will work to overcome all of life’s disappointments.”

(read the full article at this link: http://www.awmi.net/extra/article/deal_grief)

CD album: http://www.awmi.net/store/usa/cd_albums/1032_c

how to deal with grief

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